Feeling Abandoned In Times Of Adversity

#ThrowbackThursday — This post originally published July 27, 2010.

When someone close to us is sick or injured, we tend to pray for healing. When we struggle with emotional or difficult situations, we desire release from the pain. When tragedy strikes, we yearn for the time before life was ripped apart. We cry out to God for healing; to take away the pain; to relieve the suffering. But when there is no response we wonder why he has abandoned us. The real question, however, is whether we have abandoned God.

In the midst of suffering in this world it is difficult to remain focused on God. In Psalm 22 David expresses this emotion when he writes “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Why are you so far from saving me, so far from the words of my groaning?” (NIV) In the midst of his torment, as his enemies pursue him, David shows his humanity by wondering why God does not save him. He reminds God in verses 4-5 how he saved Israel before, how “In you our fathers put their trust; they trusted and you delivered them. They cried to you and were saved; in you they trusted and were not disappointed.”( NIV)

It’s the same rationale we sometimes use when we are burdened with adversity. We look at past times when God has come to our aid. We see others experience healing, the injured become whole again and others who seem to avoid tragedy all together. We remind God how he helped the faithful before and wonder why he does not help us now. In these times it is difficult to see life beyond our own struggles, to understand God’s bigger purpose. Our feelings of abandonment are a very real part of our life on earth.

Jesus experienced this emotion of feeling abandoned by God. While dying on the cross he cried out, “Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani?”— which means, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matt. 27:46 NIV). In the wake of his crucifixion, most of his followers fled for their lives. While Jesus could have sought to save himself from the immense pain of the cross, he remained focused on God’s plan for us. After his cry to God from the cross, “Jesus shouted out again, and he released his spirit.” (Matt. 27:50 NLT) This set the stage for his resurrection and our salvation.

While our pain is very real, we must be careful that it does not cause us to abandon God and his purpose. It is a part of surrendering our life to Jesus so that we may become his instrument. In the midst of his distress, David maintained his reverence for God. “You who fear the LORD, praise him! All you descendants of Jacob, honor him! Revere him, all you descendants of Israel!” (Psalm 22:23 NIV). Continuing our reverence toward God in adversity points us toward the time when we will be fully restored with God, a time when “there will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain.” (Rev. 21:4 NIV)

© 2010 CGThelen

8 thoughts on “Feeling Abandoned In Times Of Adversity

  1. Definitely not a popular train of thought but so true. Nobody wants pain but if that pain is removed too quickly the lesson, truth, and even the goodness of God is sometime too quickly forgotten. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t pray for trials to last longer, only that I would be a quick learner.

  2. It’s so important to focus on Who God is, rather than how we feel. Feelings can scream at us so loudly it threatens to drown out everything else, but when they lie, we need to CHOOSE to believe God. (My feelings can confirm the Truth, but ultimately the Truth stands on its own and needs no confirmation from me or anyone else.)

  3. Oh, how we have walked this road and share your need to cling to WHO He is vs. what He DOES. We have also been encouraged over the years by the beginning verses of 2 Cor. as we look for the redeeming features of faithful perseverance.

    “It is well with my soul” is a statement of trust. And we can’t even muster that in painful periods. The courage to let this be the heart’s whisper can only be supplied by Him.

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